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Start to learn Spanish | First steps to learning Spanish

Start to learn Spanish | First steps to learning Spanish

¡Hola, amigas y amigos de SpanishCompadres.com! My name is Husim Espinoza and today I want to tell you what is, from my experience as a language learner and instructor, the best way to start learning Spanish. If you’re reading this post, you have started taking action towards the goal of becoming a more proficient speaker of the Spanish language. Congratulations! As you will read on, there are many excellent reasons to start learning Spanish. Before you continue reading any further, keep in mind that the purpose of this article is to put you with on the starting line of the process of starting to learn a new language on your own. Therefore, we will be covering such topics as how learning Spanish will benefit you, how to start learning Spanish, how to actually learn the language, how to become fluent in Spanish, and how to learn Spanish on your own.

Contrary to what many people think, the best way to start learning Spanish (or any new language, actually) is becoming aware of the mindset that is needed in order to provide our brain with the ability to download, install and operate a new language in a proficient way. I know this may sound a little ethereal, but the first thing you need to know about how to start learning Spanish is a harsh truth: learning a new language is a process that will require, more than any other thing, the practice of self-discipline. There will be many times in which you won’t feel like going through the process of learning (quitting distractions, concentrating, doing the drills, pronouncing difficult phonemes, and so on). On these occasions, your self-disciplined action, rather than your language learning ability, will determine your success or failure on this quest. After this key point is internalized and turned into a habit, language learning is like any other process. You need to set goals, understand the big picture of the process, and follow the steps (i.e. taking action!). 

Here is a list of the topics that will be covered in order to help you get started.

 

Table of contents

 

How can learning Spanish benefit you

Being conscious of how Spanish can help you make progress is an important piece of knowledge, since it will give you extrinsic motivation to start learning this language. In our article entitled “Why is it important to learn Spanish?”, we outlined six powerful reasons to give you a little push to become a language learner:

 

#1 English speakers can take great advantage of two similarities and a fixed system of sounds

#2 Spanish is a widely spoken language

#3 The level of English in Spanish speaking countries is generally low proficiency 

#4 Spanish can help you avoid becoming a victim of tricksters and cheaters 

#5 Hispanic culture is fascinating

#6 Spanish is the language of love

In sum, learning Spanish is important because it will definitely open doors. Being the official language in 21 countries and spoken by 534.3 million people around the world, Spanish has the potential to open more doors than other languages, bringing up exciting opportunities for their users, from meeting new interesting friends to building international collaborations for study or work purposes. Due to its shared roots with English, these languages have a lot in common: both use the Roman alphabet and have a high number of similar words that can be used to boost your comprehension from the very beginning. This can help you learn Spanish faster and more easily than other foreign languages, and put your new skills into practice really soon with its many speakers. Your Spanish will be very useful when visiting Spanish speaking countries where, in general, English is not widely spoken by locals. Even more, it will protect you from crime and allow you to participate in Hispanic communities and cultures, which are many and quite diverse, and could never be fully experienced without Spanish. And, last but not least, Spanish is a beautiful musical and emotional language that will definitely flow deep into your heart and make you mind fly!

 

How can I start to learn Spanish

As we said earlier, the first and most important thing you need to consider before start learning a language is self-discipline. In other words, you need to be aware of the fact that you won’t always feel like practicing Spanish, no matter which method or course you’re following. Learning a language is like working out to stay fit. If you only work out a couple of times a week for a short time, most likely you won’t have any results. But if you work out every day for only thirty minutes, the results will be considerable better. The same happens with languages and Spanish is not an exception. Being bilingual is a privilege reserved only for those who have been persistent, willing to put in the hours and the conscious effort to achieve goals. Now that we’ve discussed the SELF-DISCIPLINE mindset that is necessary for language learning, let’s look at other factors you need to bear in mind before you start learning Spanish:

 

  1. Set clear language-learning goals in terms of what you need Spanish for. This simply means that going on vacation for a month to a Spanish speaking location is not the same as going to a Spanish speaking as an exchange student for a year. Your needs will be totally different in terms of the kind of language you will need to learn. A tourist who is going on vacation for a short period of time will need to learn language for making hotel reservations, moving around in the city, ordering food at a restaurant, buying products in the local market, etc. The focus will be on listening and speaking skills, since most of the language use contexts will be spoken. On the other hand, an exchange student will want to learn language for socializing, asking questions in class, taking a bus to school, and so on. The focus will be on all major language acquisition skills: reading, listening, writing, and speaking. In addition, do you need to validate your Spanish language level through an examination? If so, which exam is it? Are there any exam-specific courses that will help you get a good score?
  2. Look for goal-specific material o a goal-specific course. Now that you have set clear goals in terms of what you want to accomplish, look for material or a course that is specific to you needs. If you want to learn Spanish on your own, make sure that the material you purchase comes from a reputable source, since the quality of materials in the language learning industry is variable. For example, if you need to to improve your Spanish grammar, a simple search for the terms “Spanish grammar…” on Amazon can be very helpful to our purposes, since Amazon offers a wide range of results and user reviews often indicate the quality of the material. If you want to take a course, make sure that the course is taught by a prestigious institution or instruction. Most serious language institutes can be recognizable because of their history, their staff experience and number of students.
  3. Make a plan to cover the material or complete the course. Now you need to add “Spanish learning” to your daily schedule. We highly suggest having a daily planner in writing, so you can see how learning Spanish will become part of your routine. If you will learn Spanish on your own, dedicate at least half an hour a day to work on your material. If you will take a course, your instructor will tell you how much time you will need to dedicate to your daily practice in order to achieve the desired outcome.
  4. Execute the plan and stick to it with SELF DISCIPLINE. Now comes the most important part of your plan: execution. This means daily Spanish practice for at least half an hour for at least the next 6 to 12 months. Make Spanish a part of your daily life by quitting all distractions like social media, TV, music or any other to help your brain focus on the task at hand.     

 

How can we learn the Spanish language

A very interesting question that I often get asked is “How can human beings learn a language?” We learn a language by developing four skills:

  • Listening
  • Reading
  • Speaking
  • Writing

In most language language learning courses, the most basic levels focus on receptive skills (listening and reading). Productive skills (speaking and writing) are introduced gradually as learners make progress. 

You can understand what each language level means in terms of the things you can do with language. The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: Learning, Teaching, Assessment (CEFR) is an international standard that has six levels, called A1, A2, B1, B2, C1, and C2. A C2 language user is a native-like user of the target language. Most international language examinations are designed following CEFR standards. If you want to learn more about this topics, check out the links in the “useful resources” section at the end of this article. 

You also need to add vocabulary and grammar into the mix in order to make the perfect Spanish learning recipe.

Another question that we get asked all the time is “How can I learn Spanish fast for free?”. The answer to this question will depend on what the learner considers “fast”, the goals, and many other variables. Can you learn Spanish for free? Of course! You just need to find high quality materials that will suit your needs and using it rigorously without unnecessary distractions around you. 

 

How can I learn Spanish fluently

According to the Foreign Service Institute (FSI), it takes between 600 and 750 class hours (24 weeks) to achieve professional working proficiency in the target language. This information is based on the time US diplomats usually take to reach such level. A Spanish language learner may take shorter or longer depending on factors like the learner’s natural ability to learn a language, their previous linguistic experience, and guided learning time.

Note: In the FSI timelines, Spanish is a “category 1” language, meaning that it’s in the “languages more similar to English” group, along with Danish, Dutch, French, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Romanian, and Swedish. Learning any of these languages would take an average of 24 weeks. If you practice everyday for 24 weeks, it would take around 4.5 hours a day for you to achieve working proficiency (meaning you’d be able to land a job in which the target language is used).

There is more info on this interesting topic in our article entitled “How long does it take to learn Spanish”. Check it out!

 

How can I learn Spanish on my own

There are many ways in which you can learn a language by yourself at home. These are some of the ways in which you can learn Spanish at home, at your job or on the go:

  1. Use an app like Duolingo
  2. Buy a textbook on Amazon
  3. Buy an online course

Remember that the most important aspect of language learning is self discipline!

 

Conclusion

In this article, we covered some of the most important points that you need to consider before committing yourself to learning Spanish. The most important variable in the Spanish learning equation is self discipline. Like any other skill, language is acquired through systematic practice, which requires being able to stick to a course or program even when we don’t feel like practicing or attending classes. Setting language goals, finding materials or courses that meet those specific goals, making a plan and executing it are key components of any serious endeavor to acquire a second language. Developing listening, reading, speaking, and writing skills in combination with vocabulary and grammar activities will accelerate your Spanish learning process. You can test your language level with any of the standardized language examinations that are designed following CEFR standards. 

 

Useful resources

 

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We have come up with this content because we really want to help you become a more proficient speaker of Spanish. Help us spread the word by sharing this article on your social media. Click on any of the share buttons on the left (computer) or at the bottom (mobile) of your screen. ¡Comparte!

 

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Countries where Spanish is an official language

Countries where Spanish is an official language

¡Hola, amigas y amigos de SpanishCompadres.com! In this article, we’ll share with you the most interesting facts about Spanish speaking countries around the world. Did you know that there are countries where Spanish is an official language not only in America and Europe, but also in another continent? If you want to learn more about this interesting topic, keep on reading this post!

Spanish is an official language in the following countries (listed in alphabetical order): Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Spain, Uruguay, and Venezuela. Spanish is also the language of significant minorities in Andorra, Belize, Gibraltar, and the United States of America. We hope this article will help you choose your next travel destination 

 

Table of contents

 

Introduction

Spanish as an official language is spoken by more than 442 million people in three continents: America, Europe, and Africa. This number of speakers represents 5.74 percent of the world population (7.7 billion people). 

In the American continent, Spanish is officially spoken in eighteen countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela) and one dependent territory (Dominican Republic, which is a territory of the United States of America). In Europe, Spanish is the official language of Spain. In Africa, Spanish is one of the official languages in Equatorial Guinea.  

 

Countries where Spanish is an official language

 

Argentina ??

  • Spanish spelling: Argentina
  • Spanish pronunciation: /ar-hen-ti’-na/
  • Population: 44,694,198 people
  • Capital city: Buenos Aires 
  • Main exports: soybeans and derivatives, petroleum and gas, vehicles, corn, wheat
  • Main imports: machinery, motor vehicles, petroleum and natural gas, organic chemicals, plastics
  • Current leader (2019): President Mauricio Macri
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3HXXL0SXd84 

 

Bolivia ??

  • Spanish spelling: Bolivia
  • Spanish pronunciation: /bo-li’-via/ 
  • Population: 11,306,341 people
  • Capital city: La Paz
  • Main exports: natural gas, silver, zinc, lead, tin, gold, quinoa, soybeans and soy products
  • Main imports: machinery, petroleum products, vehicles, iron and steel, plastics 
  • Current leader (2019): President Evo Morales
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aDyw-hv97Os 

 

Chile ??

  • Spanish spelling: Chile
  • Spanish pronunciation: /chi’-le/
  • Population: 17,925,262 people 
  • Capital city: Santiago
  • Main exports: copper, fruit, fish products, paper and pulp, chemicals, wine
  • Main imports: petroleum and petroleum products, chemicals, electrical and telecommunications equipment, industrial machinery, vehicles, natural gas
  • Current leader (2019): President Sebastián Piñera
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Xdsji20pdU 

 

Colombia ??

  • Spanish spelling: Colombia
  • Spanish pronunciation: /ko-lom’-bia/
  • Population: 48,168,996 people
  • Capital city: Bogotá
  • Main exports: petroleum, coal, emeralds, coffee, nickel, cut flowers, bananas, apparel
  • Main imports: industrial equipment, transportation equipment, consumer goods, chemicals, paper products, fuels, electricity
  • Current leader (2019): President Iván Duque
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OCjG7jC9GzM 

 

Costa Rica ??

  • Spanish spelling: Costa Rica
  • Spanish pronunciation: /kos’-ta rri’-ka/ Roll your R in “Rica”
  • Population: 4,987,142 people
  • Capital city: San José
  • Main exports: bananas, pineapples, coffee, melons, ornamental plants, sugar; beef; seafood; electronic components, medical equipment
  • Main imports: raw materials, consumer goods, capital equipment, petroleum, construction materials
  • Current leader (2019): President Carlos Alvarado 
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UqSaYhUuqUM 

 

Cuba ??

  • Spanish spelling: Cuba
  • Spanish pronunciation: /ku’-ba/ 
  • Population: 11,116,396 people
  • Capital city: La Habana
  • Main exports: petroleum, nickel, medical products, sugar, tobacco, fish, citrus, coffee
  • Main imports: petroleum, food, machinery and equipment, chemicals
  • Current leader (2019): President Miguel Díaz-Canel
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TNj_Y8mJJMw 

 

Dominican Republic ??

  • Spanish spelling: República Dominicana
  • Spanish pronunciation: /rre-pu’-bli-ka do-mi-ni-ka’-na/ Roll your R in “República”
  • Population: 10,298,756 people
  • Capital city: Santo Domingo
  • Main exports: gold, silver, cocoa, sugar, coffee, tobacco, meats, consumer goods
  • Main imports: petroleum, foodstuffs, cotton and fabrics, chemicals and pharmaceuticals
  • Current leader (2019): President Danilo Medina
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=paHFoDhiBpc 

 

Ecuador ??

  • Spanish spelling: Ecuador
  • Spanish pronunciation: /e-kua-dor’/
  • Population: 16,498,502 people
  • Capital city: Quito
  • Main exports: petroleum, bananas, cut flowers, shrimp, cacao, coffee, wood, fish
  • Main imports: industrial materials, fuels and lubricants, nondurable consumer goods
  • Current leader (2019): President Lenín Moreno
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AlJhfPmBHMU 

 

El Salvador ??

  • Spanish spelling: El Salvador
  • Spanish pronunciation: /el sal-va-dor’/
  • Population: 6,187,271 people
  • Capital city: San Salvador
  • Main exports: offshore assembly exports, coffee, sugar, textiles and apparel, ethanol, chemicals, electricity, iron and steel manufactures
  • Main imports: raw materials, consumer goods, capital goods, fuels, foodstuffs, petroleum, electricity
  • Current leader (2019): President Nayib Bukele
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKlgyzavWE0  

 

Equatorial Guinea ??

  • Spanish spelling: Guinea Ecuatorial
  • Spanish pronunciation: /gi-ne’-a e-kua-to-rial’/ /g/ is the first sound in gobierno
  • Population: 797,457 people
  • Capital city: Malabo
  • Main exports: petroleum products, timber
  • Main imports: petroleum sector equipment, other equipment, construction materials, vehicles
  • Current leader (2019): President Teodoro Obiang 
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSzCnfeD6Ig  

 

Guatemala ??

  • Spanish spelling: Guatemala
  • Spanish pronunciation: /gua-te-ma’-la/
  • Population: 16,581,273 people
  • Capital city: Ciudad de Guatemala
  • Main exports: sugar, coffee, petroleum, apparel, bananas, fruits and vegetables, cardamom, manufacturing products, precious stones and metals, electricity
  • Main imports: fuels, machinery and transport equipment, construction materials, grain, fertilizers, electricity, mineral products, chemical products, plastic materials and products
  • Current leader (2019): President Jimmy Morales 
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_hoilJzID0 

 

Honduras ??

  • Spanish spelling: Honduras
  • Spanish pronunciation: /on-du’-ras/
  • Population: 9,182,766 people
  • Capital city: Tegucigalpa
  • Main exports: coffee, apparel, coffee, shrimp, automobile wire harnesses, cigars, bananas, gold, palm oil, fruit, lobster, lumber
  • Main imports: communications equipment, machinery and transport, industrial raw materials, chemical products, fuels, foodstuffs
  • Current leader (2019): President Juan Orlando Hernández
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCWMELqlwWM 

 

Mexico ??

  • Spanish spelling: México
  • Spanish pronunciation: /me’-hi-ko/
  • Population: 125,959,205 people
  • Capital city: Ciudad de México
  • Main exports: manufactured goods, electronics, vehicles and auto parts, oil and oil products, silver, plastics, fruits, vegetables, coffee, cotton; Mexico is the world’s leading producer of silver
  • Main imports: metalworking machines, steel mill products, agricultural machinery, electrical equipment, automobile parts for assembly and repair, aircraft, aircraft parts, plastics, natural gas and oil products
  • Current leader (2019): President Andrés Manuel López Obrador
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXcdqF2PjLw  

 

Nicaragua ??

  • Spanish spelling: Nicaragua
  • Spanish pronunciation: /ni-ka-ra’-gua/
  • Population: 6,085,213 people
  • Capital city: Managua
  • Main exports: coffee, beef, gold, sugar, peanuts, shrimp and lobster, tobacco, cigars, automobile wiring harnesses, textiles, apparel
  • Main imports: consumer goods, machinery and equipment, raw materials, petroleum products
  • Current leader (2019): President Daniel Ortega 
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8zxb6Lh7qs 

 

Panama ??

  • Spanish spelling: Panamá
  • Spanish pronunciation: /pa-na-ma’/
  • Population: 3,800,644 people
  • Capital city: Panamá
  • Main exports: fruit and nuts, fish, iron and steel waste, wood 
  • Main imports: fuels, machinery, vehicles, iron and steel rods, pharmaceuticals
  • Current leader (2019): President Juan Carlos Varela
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tcl9q45IbnM  

 

Paraguay ??

  • Spanish spelling: Paraguay
  • Spanish pronunciation: /pa-ra-gua’i/
  • Population: 7,025,763 people
  • Capital city: Asunción
  • Main exports: soybeans, livestock feed, cotton, meat, edible oils, wood, leather, gold
  • Main imports: road vehicles, consumer goods, tobacco, petroleum products, electrical machinery, tractors, chemicals, vehicle parts
  • Current leader (2019): President Mario Abdo Benítez
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kA17HCuhlOs 

 

Peru ??

  • Spanish spelling: Perú
  • Spanish pronunciation: /pe-ru’/ 
  • Population: 31,331,228 people
  • Capital city: Lima
  • Main exports: copper, gold, lead, zinc, tin, iron ore, molybdenum, silver; crude petroleum and petroleum products, natural gas; coffee, asparagus and other vegetables, fruit, apparel and textiles, fishmeal, fish, chemicals, fabricated metal products and machinery, alloys
  • Main imports: petroleum and petroleum products, chemicals, plastics, machinery, vehicles, TV sets, power shovels, front-end loaders, telephones and telecommunication equipment, iron and steel, wheat, corn, soybean products, paper, cotton, vaccines and medicines
  • Current leader (2019): President Martín Vizcarra
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZYf8QM9agw 

 

Spain ??

  • Spanish spelling: España
  • Spanish pronunciation: /es-pa’-ña/ ñ sounds like the first sound in the Italian word gnocchi
  • Population: 49,331,076 people
  • Capital city: Madrid
  • Main exports: machinery, motor vehicles; foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals, medicines, other consumer goods
  • Main imports: machinery and equipment, fuels, chemicals, semi-finished goods, foodstuffs, consumer goods, measuring and medical control instruments
  • Current leader (2019): President Pedro Sánchez
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UwrcycrjNUo 

 

Uruguay ??

  • Spanish spelling: Uruguay
  • Spanish pronunciation: /u-ru-gua’i/
  • Population: 3,369,299 people
  • Capital city: Montevideo
  • Main exports: beef, soybeans, cellulose, rice, wheat, wood, dairy products, wool
  • Main imports: refined oil, crude oil, passenger and other transportation vehicles, vehicle parts, cellular phones
  • Current leader (2019): President Tabaré Vázquez
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZig1rNG5Do 

 

Venezuela ??

  • Spanish spelling: Venezuela
  • Spanish pronunciation: /ve-ne-sue’-la/
  • Population: 31,689,176 people
  • Capital city: Caracas
  • Main exports: petroleum and petroleum products, bauxite and aluminum, minerals, chemicals, agricultural products
  • Main imports: agricultural products, livestock, raw materials, machinery and equipment, transport equipment, construction materials, medical equipment, petroleum products, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, iron and steel products
  • Current leader (2019): President Nicolás Maduro
  • Current leader interview (accent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVkwC0FZDn0 

 

Countries and territories where Spanish is spoken by significant minorities

 

Andorra ??

  • Spanish spelling: Andorra
  • Spanish pronunciation: /an-do’-rra/ Roll your R in the final syllable
  • Population: 85,708 people
  • Spanish speakers: 29,907 people (around 35% of the population)
  • Capital city: Andorra la Vella
  • Main exports: tobacco products, furniture
  • Main imports: consumer goods, food, fuel, electricity
  • Current leader (2019): President Xavier Espot

 

Belize ??

  • Spanish spelling: Belice
  • Spanish pronunciation: /be-li’-se/
  • Population: 385,854 people
  • Spanish speakers: 106,795 people (around 31% of the population)
  • Capital city: Belmopán
  • Main exports: sugar, bananas, citrus, clothing, fish products, molasses, wood, crude oil 
  • Main imports: machinery and transport equipment, manufactured goods; fuels, chemicals, pharmaceuticals; food, beverages, tobacco 
  • Current leader (2019): Prime Minister Dean Barrow 

 

Gibraltar ??

  • Spanish spelling: Gibraltar
  • Spanish pronunciation: /hi-bral-tar’/
  • Population: 29,461 people
  • Spanish speakers: 23,857 people (around 82% of the population)
  • Capital city: Gibraltar
  • Main exports: (principally reexports) petroleum 51%, manufactured goods (2010 est.)
  • Main imports: fuels, manufactured goods, foodstuffs
  • Current leader (2019): Prime Minister Fabian Picardo

 

The United States of America ??

  • Spanish spelling: Estados Unidos
  • Spanish pronunciation: /es-ta’-dos u-ni’-dos/
  • Population: 318,892,103 people
  • Spanish speakers: 52,000,000 people (around 16% of the population)
  • Capital city: Washington D.C.
  • Main exports: agricultural products (soybeans, fruit, corn) 9.2%, industrial supplies (organic chemicals) 26.8%, capital goods (transistors, aircraft, motor vehicle parts, computers, telecommunications equipment) 49.0%, consumer goods (automobiles, medicines) 15.0% (2008 est.)
  • Main imports: agricultural products 4.9%, industrial supplies 32.9% (crude oil 8.2%), capital goods 30.4% (computers, telecommunications equipment, motor vehicle parts, office machines, electric power machinery), consumer goods 31.8% (automobiles, clothing, medicines, furniture, toys) (2008 est.)
  • Current leader (2019): President Donald Trump

 

Conclusion

As we said in our article “Why is it important to learn Spanish? | Top 6 reasons”:

The fourth most widely spoken language in the world, only after English, Chinese and Hindi, Spanish is currently the majority language in the following 21 countries and territories: Mexico, Colombia, Spain, Argentina, Peru, Venezuela, Chile, Ecuador, Guatemala, Cuba, Bolivia, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Paraguay, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, Panama, Uruguay and Equatorial Guinea. Only in the mentioned nations, there are over 442,000,000 Spanish speakers. Let us consider now Spanish speaking residents in countries where Spanish is not the official language. Only in the United States, the largest population of Spanish speaking residents, there are about 52 million! Actually, the estimated number of Spanish speakers in the world is as high as 534.3 million. Is it important to speak Spanish if it helps you reach about 661 million potential friends, coworkers, collaborators or clients? Also, who knows? Maybe even your soulmate is one of them, too?

Knowing the most important facts about Spanish speaking countries and territories will help you take good traveling decisions if you feel like visiting one of the countries described in the article, whether as a tourist or on business.

 

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Resources

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Top 10 Spanish jokes explained

Top 10 Spanish jokes explained

¡Hola, amigas y amigos de SpanishCompadres.com! Jokes are great conversation starters and ice breakers in any language, especially when you are in situations in which you have to interact with groups of people in an informal setting. Spanish is not an exception. Humor...

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19 Spanish quotes for language learning

19 Spanish quotes for language learning

¡Hola, amigas y amigos de SpanishCompadres.com! In this post, we’ll share 19 famous Spanish quotes that will help you improve your language skills. We have selected one famous quote from one prominent intellectual per Spanish speaking country, so you can get to know the words of intellectuals from Latin America and Spain. We know we’re leaving many good quotes out, but we’re saving those for a future post.

 

Learning famous Spanish quotes is a great way to improve your language skills by expanding your vocabulary in order to be able to understand each quote thoroughly. Our selection of famous Spanish quotes includes authors like Jorge Luis Borges (Argentina), Gabriela Mistral (Chile), Gabriel García Márquez (Colombia), Miguel De Cervantes (Spain), and many other Spanish speaking writers. 

 

Table of contents

 

Argentina

“De todos los instrumentos del hombre, el más asombroso es, sin duda, el libro. Los demás son extensiones de su cuerpo. El microscopio, el telescopio, son extensiones de su vista; el teléfono es extensión de la voz; luego tenemos el arado y la espada, extensiones del brazo. Pero el libro es otra cosa: el libro es una extensión de la memoria y la imaginación.” (Jorge Luis Borges, escritor argentino, 1899 – 1986)

“Out of all man’s instruments, the most amazing one us, without a doubt, the book. The other ones are extensions of his body. The microscope, the telescope are extensions of his sight; the telephone is an extension of the voice; we then have the plow and the sword, extensions of the arm. But the book is another thing: the book is an extension of memory and imagination.” (Jorge Luis Borges, Argentinian writer, 1899 – 1986)

 

Bolivia

“Conocemos al hombre teórico, genérico, eterno, pero estamos incapacitados para el conocimiento del primero que pasa por la calle o de nosotros mismos. Le conviene al pícaro ignorar a las gentes honradas y al mediocre le interesa desconocer que existen hombres de inteligencia superior.” (Gustavo Adolfo Otero, escritor boliviano, 1896 – 1958) 

“We know the theoretical man, generic, eternal, but we are unable to know the one that passes by on the street or ourselves. It’s convenient for the rogue to ignore the honorable and for the mediocre to ignore that men of superior intelligence exist.” (Gustavo Adolfo Otero, Bolivian writer, 1896 – 1958) 

 

Chile

“Donde haya un árbol que plantar, plántalo tú. Donde haya un error que enmendar, enmiéndalo tú. Donde haya un esfuerzo que todos esquivan, hazlo tú. Sé tú el que aparta la piedra del camino”. (Gabriela Mistral, escritora chilena, 1889 – 1957) 

“Where there is a tree to be planted, you plant it. Where there is an error to fix, you fix it. Where there is an effort that everybody avoids, you do it. Be the one that removes the rock from the road.” (Gabriela Mistral, Chilean writer, 1889 – 1957) 

 

Colombia

“El escritor escribe su libro para explicarse a sí mismo lo que no se puede explicar.” (Gabriel García Márquez, escritor colombiano, 1927 – 2014)

“The writer writes his book in order to explain to himself what can’t be explained.” (Gabriel García Márquez, Colombian writer, 1927 – 2014)

 

Costa Rica

“Todo escritor sincero y genuino que desea reflejar la realidad de su pueblo, llegará a la conclusión de que esa gente con la que vive es la que le da todo y la que en definitiva inspira y construye su obra literaria”. (Fabián Dobles, escritor costarricense, 1918 – 1997)

“Every honest and genuine writer that wishes to reflect the reality of his people, will come to the conclusion that those people he lives with are the ones that give him everything and the ones who definitely inspire and build his literary work.” (Fabián Dobles, Costa Rican writer, 1918 – 1997)  

 

Cuba

“Ayudar al que lo necesita no solo es parte del deber, sino de la felicidad.” (José Martí, escritor cubano, 1853 – 1895) 

“Helping out the one who needs it is not only part of duty, but of happiness.” (José Martí, Cuban writer, 1853 – 1895)  

 

Dominican Republic

“La esperanza es la raíz en la humedad, y el arroyo en el desierto.” (Pedro Mir, escritor dominicano, 1913 – 2000)

“Hope is the root in the moisture and the stream in the desert.” (Pedro Mir, Dominican writer, 1913 – 2000) 

 

Ecuador

“El verdadero buscador crece y aprende, y descubre que siempre es el principal responsable de lo que sucede.” (Jorge Icaza Coronel, escritor ecuatoriano, 1906 – 1978)

“The true seeker grows and learns, and discovers that he’s always the main responsible for what happens” (Jorge Icaza Coronel, Ecuadorian writer, 1906 – 1978)

 

El Salvador

“Hay una ciencia que debe ocupar toda la vida del hombre, desde que su razón despierta hasta que deja de vivir: tal es la moral o ciencia de la conducta, la más práctica e interesante de todas, pues de su conocimiento y aplicación depende que la humanidad avance o retroceda.” (Alberto Masferrer, escritor salvadoreño, 1868 – 1932) 

“There is a science that must occupy all of man’s life, since his reason awakes until he stops living: such is morals or science of conduct, the most practical and interesting of all, for humanity’s upgrade or downgrade depend on its knowledge and application.” (Alberto Masferrer, Salvadoran writer, 1868 – 1932) 

 

Guatemala

“Los espejos son como la conciencia. Uno se ve allí como es, y como no es, pues quien se ve en lo profundo del espejo trata de disimular sus fealdades y arreglarlas para parecer a gusto.” (Miguel Ángel Asturias, escritor guatemalteco, 1899 – 1974)

“Mirrors are as conscience. One sees oneself as one is, and as is not, for whom sees themselves deep in the mirror tries to hide their ugliness and fix it to seem at ease.” (Miguel Ángel Asturias, Guatemalan writer, 1899 – 1974)

 

Honduras

“Lo esencial no está en ser poeta, ni artista ni filósofo. Lo esencial es que cada uno tenga la dignidad de su trabajo, la conciencia de su trabajo. El orgullo de hacer las cosas bien, el entusiasmo de sentirse transitoriamente satisfecho de su obra, de quererla, de admirarla, es la sana recompensa de los fuertes, de los que tienen el corazón robusto y el espíritu limpio”. (Alfonso Guillén Zelaya, escritor hondureño, 1887 – 1947)

“The essential is not in being a poet, an artist or a philosopher. The essential is that each one has the dignity of their job, the consciousness of their job. The pride of doing things well, the enthusiasm of feeling transiently satisfied with their work, of loving it, of admiring it, is the healthy reward of the strong, of those who have a robust heart and a clean spirit.” (Alfonso Guillén Zelaya, Honduran writer, 1887 – 1947)  

 

Mexico

“Lo que a mi me parece inaceptable es que un escritor o un intelectual se someta a un partido o a una iglesia” (Octavio Paz, escritor mexicano, 1914 – 1998)

“What I find unacceptable is that a writer or intellectual subjects himself to a political party or to a church.” (Octavio Paz, Mexican writer, 1914 – 1998) 

 

Nicaragua

“No dejes apagar el entusiasmo, virtud tan valiosa como necesaria; trabaja, aspira, tiende siempre hacia la altura.” (Rubén Darío, escritor nicaragüense, 1867 – 1916)

“Don’t let enthusiasm, both valuable and necessary virtue, shut down; work, aspire, always tend to height.” (Rubén Darío, Nicaraguan writer, 1867 – 1916) 

 

Panama

“La literatura es expresión de la vida social, trasunto de valores humanos, un instrumento que ayuda a la mejor comprensión del ser íntimo de un pueblo.” (Rodrigo Miró Grimaldo, escritor panameño, 1912-1996)

“Literature is the expression of social life, transcript of human value, an instrument that contributes to a better understanding of the intimate being of a people.” (Rodrigo Miró Grimaldo, Panamanian writer, 1912-1996)   

 

Paraguay

“Ninguna historia puede ser contada. Ninguna historia que valga la pena ser contada. Más el verdadero lenguaje no nació todavía. Los animales se comunican entre ellos, sin palabras, mejor que nosotros, ufanos de haberlas inventado con la materia prima de lo quimérico.” (Augusto Roa Bastos, escritor paraguayo, 1917 – 2005)

“No story can be told. No story that is worth being told. But true language hasn’t been born yet. Animals communicate among themselves, without words, better than us, who brag about inventing them with the raw material of the chimerical.” (Augusto Roa Bastos, Paraguayan writer, 1917 – 2005)

 

Peru

“Nada enriquece tanto los sentidos, la sensibilidad, los deseos humanos, como la lectura. Estoy completamente convencido de que una persona que lee, y que lee bien, disfruta muchísimo mejor de la vida, aunque también es una persona que tiene más problemas frente al mundo.” (Mario Vargas Llosa, escritor peruano, 1936 – )

“Nothing enriches senses –sensitivity, human desires– as much as reading. I’m completely convinced that a person who reads, and reads well, enjoys life in a much better way, even though they are a person who has more problems in front of the world.” (Mario Vargas Llosa, Peruvian writer, 1936 – )

 

Spain

“La abundancia de las cosas, aunque sean buenas, hace que no se estimen, y la carestía, aún de las malas, se estima en algo.” (Miguel de Cervantes, escritor español, 1547 – 1616)

“The abundance of things, even if they are good, makes us not esteem them, and the shortage, even of the bad ones, is somewhat esteemed.” (Miguel de Cervantes, Spanish writer, 1547 – 1616)

 

Uruguay

“El fútbol es la única religión que no tiene ateos.” (Eduardo Galeano, escritor uruguayo, 1940 – 2015)

“Football (soccer) is the only religion that has no atheists.” (Eduardo Galeano, Uruguayan writer, 1940 – 2015) 

 

Venezuela

“No aceptes nunca como compañero de viaje a quien no conozcas como a tus manos.” (Rómulo Gallegos, escritor venezolano, 1884 – 1969)

“Never accept a fellow traveler you don’t know as your own hands.” (Rómulo Gallegos, Venezuelan writer, 1884 – 1969)

 

Conclusion

Famous Spanish quotes are a great way of knowing Spanish speaking culture in depth. Thoroughly understanding these famous Spanish quotes requires intensive vocabulary preparation, since they cover a wide range of topics. We suggest reading these quotes at least a couple of time, practicing pronunciation and retaining the names and countries of the selected authors. 

 

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Resources

 

Business Spanish vocabulary | 100 key words and phrases

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Top 10 Spanish jokes explained

Top 10 Spanish jokes explained

¡Hola, amigas y amigos de SpanishCompadres.com! Jokes are great conversation starters and ice breakers in any language, especially when you are in situations in which you have to interact with groups of people in an informal setting. Spanish is not an exception. Humor...

read more
Top 10 Spanish jokes explained

Top 10 Spanish jokes explained

¡Hola, amigas y amigos de SpanishCompadres.com! Jokes are great conversation starters and ice breakers in any language, especially when you are in situations in which you have to interact with groups of people in an informal setting. Spanish is not an exception. Humor is a big part of culture in Spanish speaking countries. You’ve probably heard that Hispanic culture is more cheerful and laid back than other cultures. One of the most explicit manifestations of this cultural aspect are jokes. Jokes are part of everyday, real-life language in Spanish. Therefore, it is important that you learn how to use humor in order to communicate better and blend in.

The Spanish jokes we’ll show you in this article are appropriate for learners of all ages, since they do not contain faulty language and they are not offensive towards any particular group. As a speaker of Spanish as a foreign language, you want to keep your vocabulary as clean as possible, since your choice of words will say many things about you and your personality. Jokes are fun as long as no one feels they’re being picked on. Note: as in any culture, there are Spanish jokes (many of them, in fact) that use dirty words and are offensive towards particular groups of people. At SpanishCompadres.com we don’t condone such type of humor. We are against it.

Having clarified this very important issue, we’ll have fun with some good old classic Spanish jokes. Here are ten jokes that will crack you up.

 

Table of contents

 

Spanish joke #1

Un loro llega gritando “¡Soy el rey de la selva! Aparece el león y lo noquea tras darle una golpiza. Alguien recoge al loro y lo pone en una jaula. Cuando el loro despierta y se da cuenta de que está en una jaula, grita “¡Qué paliza le habré dado al león para que me pongan en la cárcel”.

Translation: A parrot comes screaming “I’m the king of the jungle!”. The lion shows up and knocks him out after giving him a beating. Someone picks up the parrot and puts it in a cage. When the parrot wakes up and realizes he’s in a cage, he screams “I must have beaten that lion so hard they put me in jail”.

Explanation: not needed

 

Spanish Joke #2

  • ¿Por qué no están juntos?
  • Porque ella come amigos.
  • ¿Qué? ¿Cómo eso de que come amigos?
  • Sí. Me dijo “Te quiero, pero como amigos”.
  • Jajajaja.

Translation

  • Why aren’t you together?
  • Because she eats friends.
  • What? How do you mean she eats friends?
  • Yes. She told me “I love you, but I eat friends”.
  • Hahahaha.

Explanation: Depending on the context, the Spanish word “como” means “I eat” (from the verb “comer”) or “like” (as in “What is he like?”). This joke is a play on words using these two meanings of the word “como”.

 

Spanish joke #3

  • ¿Cuál es su nivel de inglés?
  • Mi nivel de inglés es avanzado.
  • OK. Traduzca la palabra “fiesta”.
  • Fácil: “party”.
  • Muy bien. Úsela en una oración.
  • Ayer me party el hocico andando en bicicleta.
  • Jajajaja.

Translation

  • What’s your level of English?
  • My level of English is advanced. 
  • Ok. Translate the word “fiesta”.
  • Easy: “party”.
  • Very well. Use it in a sentence.
  • Yesterday I wounded my snout bike riding.
  • Hahahaha.

Explanation: The Spanish word “fiesta” translate as “party” in English. The word “party” sounds similar to the Spanish word “partí”, which, in the context of this joke, is the past tense of “break” (as in “to wound” or “to damage”). Also, it is very common in Spanish jokes and informal language to use the word “hocico” (snout) instead of “boca” (mouth).

 

Spanish joke #4

  • Amor, ¿te gusta mi disfraz?
  • Sí. Te ves hermosa de vaca.
  • Es un dálmata.

Translation

  • Honey, do you like my costume?
  • Yes. You look beautiful as a cow.
  • It’s a dalmatian dog.

Explanation: not needed

 

Spanish joke #5

  • ¿A qué te dedicas?
  • Soy rockero.
  • ¡Guau! ¿Cantas o tocas un instrumento en un grupo?
  • No. Junto rocas y las vendo.
  • Jajajaja.

Translation

  • What do you do?
  • I’m a rocker.
  • Wow! Do you sing or play an instrument in a band?
  • No. I collect rocks and I sell them.
  • Hahaha.

Explanation: not needed

 

Spanish joke #6

Una pareja de ancianos va a un restaurante de comida rápida, donde con cuidado divide en dos la hamburguesa y las papas fritas. Un camionero siente pena por ellos y se ofrece a comprarle a la esposa su propia comida. 

—No se preocupe —dice el anciano—, nosotros compartimos todo.

Unos minutos después, el camionero se da cuenta de que la esposa no ha probado bocado.

—De verdad no me importa comprarle su propia comida —insiste.

—No se preocupe, ella comerá su parte —le asegura el anciano—. Lo compartimos todo.

Poco convencido, el camionero le pregunta a la esposa:

—¿Por qué no come?

—¡Porque estoy esperando a que mi esposo me preste la dentadura!

Translation

An elderly couple goes to a fast food restaurant, where they carefully divide they hamburger and fries in two halves. A young man feels sorry for them and he offers to buy the old lady her own food.  

—Don’t worry  —says the old man—, we share everything.

A few minutes later the young man realizes the old lady hasn’t eaten anything.

—I really don’t mind paying for her meal —the young man insists.

—Don’t worry. She’ll eat her part. —said the old man—. We share everything.

Not entirely convinced, the young man asks the old lady:

—Why don’t you eat?

—¡Because I’m waiting for my husband to lend me the denture!

Explanation: not needed

 

Spanish joke #7

Una pareja de ancianos va a un restaurante de comida rápida, donde con cuidado divide en dos la hamburguesa y las papas fritas. Un camionero siente pena por ellos y se ofrece a comprarle a la esposa su propia comida. 

—No se preocupe —dice el anciano—, nosotros compartimos todo.

Unos minutos después, el camionero se da cuenta de que la esposa no ha probado bocado.

—De verdad no me importa comprarle su propia comida —insiste.

—No se preocupe, ella comerá su parte —le asegura el anciano—. Lo compartimos todo.

Poco convencido, el camionero le pregunta a la esposa:

—¿Por qué no come?

—¡Porque estoy esperando a que mi esposo me preste la dentadura!

Translation

An elderly couple goes to a fast food restaurant, where they carefully divide they hamburger and fries in two halves. A young man feels sorry for them and he offers to buy the old lady her own food.  

—Don’t worry  —says the old man—, we share everything.

A few minutes later the young man realizes the old lady hasn’t eaten anything.

—I really don’t mind paying for her meal —the young man insists.

—Don’t worry. She’ll eat her part. —said the old man—. We share everything.

Not entirely convinced, the young man asks the old lady:

—Why don’t you eat?

—¡Because I’m waiting for my husband to lend me the denture!

Explanation: not needed

 

Spanish joke #8

En pleno otoño, los indios de una reservación muy lejana le preguntan a su nuevo jefe si el próximo invierno será frío o templado. Ya que el jefe pertenece a una generación moderna y jamás aprendió los viejos secretos de sus ancestros, mira al cielo y no puede predecir qué va a suceder con el clima. Aun así, les advierte que recojan leña. Como es un hombre práctico, poco tiempo después llama por teléfono al Servicio Meteorológico Nacional. 

—¿El próximo invierno será muy frío? —pregunta. 

—Es probable —le contestan. 

El jefe vuelve con su pueblo y les dice que se pongan a juntar más leña. 

Una semana después, llama de nuevo por teléfono. 

—¿Será un invierno muy frío? —vuelve a preguntar. 

—Sí, será un invierno muy frío —le responden. 

El jefe vuelve a ordenar a su gente recolectar toda la leña que puedan. 

Dos semanas más tarde, el jefe hace otra llamada telefónica: 

—¿Están seguros de que el próximo invierno será muy frío? 

—Completamente —le contestan—. Va a ser uno de los inviernos más fríos que se hayan conocido. 

—¿Y cómo están tan seguros? —indaga el jefe. 

—¡Porque los indios están juntando leña como locos!

Translation

In autumn, indians in a very distant reservation ask their new chief whether the  next winter will be just chilly or really freezing. Since the chief belongs to a more modern generation and never learned the old secrets of his ancestors, he looks at the sky and can’t predict what will happen with the weather. Despite this fact, he suggests they should collect firewood. Since the chief is a practical man, he calls the National Weather Service.    

—How cold will next winter be?— asks the chief.

—It will be very cold —they reply.

The chief gathers his people and commands them to collect all the firewood they can. Two weeks after that, the chief calls the National Weather Service again. 

—Are you completely sure next winter will be really cold? 

—Absolutely —they answer—. It will be one of the coldest winters ever.

—How come you’re so sure? —asks the chief. 

—¡Because the indians are collecting firewood like crazy!

Explanation: not needed

 

Spanish joke #9

Un borracho grita en la playa como un loco:

– ¡Una BALLENA, una BALLENA!

Se acercan todos los bañistas corriendo. Debido a la multitud que se formó, vienen los policías y preguntan:

– ¿Dónde está la ballena?

El hombre responde:

– No, no señor, es que se me han caído dos botellas de cerveza al mar y una VA LLENA.

Translation

A drunkard screams in the beach like a crazy person

– A whale! A whale! (whale = ballena)

Everyone in the beach rushes to gather around the drunk man. Due to the great crowd that gathered around the man, police officers show up and ask:

– Where is the whale?

The drunkard responds:

– Oh… No, sir. What happened is I dropped two bottles of beer and one of them is full (va llena). 

Explanation: The word “ballena” (whale) is almost identical in sound to the words “va llena” (is full). Example: La camioneta va llena de productos (The panel van is full of products). This joke is a play on words with “ballena” and “vallena”.

 

Spanish joke #10

-Vaya tío, he soñado que ganaba $300 millones como mi padre.

– ¿Tu padre gana $300 millones?

– No, también lo sueña.

– Jajajaja.

Translation

– Hey man, I’ve dreamed I earn $300 million like my father.

– You father earns $300 million?

– No, he also dreams about it.

– Hahahaha.

Explanation: not needed

 

Spanish joke #bonus

Un niño regresa a casa después de su entrenamiento de fútbol.

  • ¡Hola, papá!
  • Hola, hijo. ¿Cómo te fue?
  • El entrenador dijo que soy garantía de gol.
  • No sabía que juegas de delantero.
  • No, papá. Soy arquero.

Translation

A kid returns home from soccer practice:

  • Hi, dad!
  • Hi, son. How did it go?
  • The coach said I’m a guarantee for goals.
  • I didn’t know you play as a forward.
  • No, dad. I’m a goalkeeper.

Explanation: not needed

 

Conclusion

We hope these Spanish jokes have helped you improve your Spanish. Humor is always a great ice breaker and conversation starter. Laughter is a universal language that can be easily activated by the right joke at the right time. Spanish speaking cultures enjoy listening to and telling jokes with friends in informal contexts. Being able to tell and understand jokes will help you blend in with locals end really enjoy rich aspects culture when you travel to a Spanish speaking country or participate in Spanish speaking interactions.

 

Resources

 

 

Business Spanish vocabulary | 100 key words and phrases

¡Hola, amigas y amigos de SpanishCompadres.com! Welcome to a new, amazing post. My name is Husim Espinoza and I am one of the founders of this blog. Apart from being a licensed language instructor, I also have a business degree from a public university in my home...

Start to learn Spanish | First steps to learning Spanish

¡Hola, amigas y amigos de SpanishCompadres.com! My name is Husim Espinoza and today I want to tell you what is, from my experience as a language learner and instructor, the best way to start learning Spanish. If you’re reading this post, you have started taking action...

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Top 10 Spanish jokes explained

Top 10 Spanish jokes explained

¡Hola, amigas y amigos de SpanishCompadres.com! Jokes are great conversation starters and ice breakers in any language, especially when you are in situations in which you have to interact with groups of people in an informal setting. Spanish is not an exception. Humor...

read more
Most common Spanish last names per country

Most common Spanish last names per country

¡Hola, amigas y amigos de SpanishCompadres.com! In this post, we’ll show the most common Spanish last names per Spanish speaking country.

Knowing the most common Spanish last names per country will give you a better understanding of Spanish speaking culture. Although the list of common Spanish last names varies from country, there are some Spanish last names that are popular in all Spanish speaking countries, such as González, Muñoz, Rojas, Díaz, Pérez, Soto, Contreras, Silva, Martínez, Sepúlveda, and many others. You’ve probably met some native Spanish speakers with these last names in your country. 

 

Table of contents

 

Introduction

Last names were created as social groups grew bigger. Most countries adopted the use of family names between the XII and XX centuries.

As you continue reading this list of surnames, you’ll notice that many Spanish last names have the ending “ez”. In the old days, this meant “son of”. For example, the last name “González” meant “son or daughter of Gonzalo”. The last name “Rodríguez” meant “son or daughter of Rodrigo”. “Fernández” stood for “son or daughter of Fernando”.

Note 1: The Spanish “ez” ending is equivalent to the English “son” at the end of surnames (e.g. Morrison, Harrison), the Scottish “Mc” or “Mac” at the beginning of last names (McDonald, Mackay), or the Irish “O” (O’Higgins, O’Hara).

Rules for the formation of last names were published in Spain after the Council of Trent, which was held between the years 1545 – 1563.

Note 2: for some countries, there are lists with up to 100 last names. The available lists for other countries are much shorter. 

 

Let’s check out the most common last names in each Spanish speaking country.      

 

Most common last names in Argentina

  1. González
  2. Rodríguez
  3. Gómez
  4. Fernández
  5. López
  6. Díaz
  7. Martínez
  8. Pérez
  9. García
  10. Sánchez
  11. Romero
  12. Sosa
  13. Torres
  14. Álvarez
  15. Ruiz
  16. Ramírez
  17. Flores
  18. Benítez
  19. Acosta
  20. Medina
  21. Herrera
  22. Suárez
  23. Aguirre
  24. Giménez
  25. Gutiérrez
  26. Pereyra
  27. Rojas
  28. Molina
  29. Castro
  30. Ortiz
  31. Silva
  32. Núñez
  33. Luna
  34. Juárez
  35. Cabrera
  36. Ríos
  37. Morales
  38. Godoy
  39. Moreno
  40. Ferreyra
  41. Domínguez
  42. Carrizo
  43. Peralta
  44. Castillo
  45. Ledesma
  46. Quiroga
  47. Vega
  48. Vera
  49. Muñoz
  50. Ojeda
  51. Ponce
  52. Villalba
  53. Cardozo
  54. Navarro
  55. Coronel
  56. Vázquez
  57. Ramos
  58. Vargas
  59. Cáceres
  60. Arias
  61. Figueroa
  62. Córdoba
  63. Correa
  64. Maldonado
  65. Paz
  66. Rivero
  67. Miranda
  68. Mansilla
  69. Farias
  70. Roldán
  71. Méndez
  72. Guzmán
  73. Aguero
  74. Hernández
  75. Lucero
  76. Cruz
  77. Páez
  78. Escobar
  79. Mendoza
  80. Barrios
  81. Bustos
  82. Ávila
  83. Ayala
  84. Blanco
  85. Soria
  86. Maidana
  87. Acuña
  88. Leiva
  89. Duarte
  90. Moyano
  91. Campos
  92. Soto
  93. Martín
  94. Valdez
  95. Bravo
  96. Chávez
  97. Velázquez
  98. Olivera
  99. Toledo
  100. Franco

 

Most common last names in Bolivia

  1. Mamani
  2. Flores
  3. Quispe
  4. Choque
  5. Vargas
  6. Condori
  7. Rodriguez
  8. Rojas
  9. Gutierrez
  10. Lopez
  11. Fernandez
  12. Gonzales
  13. Garcia
  14. Cruz
  15. Perez
  16. Mendoza
  17. Sanchez
  18. Martinez
  19. Chavez
  20. Ramos
  21. Apaza
  22. Huanca
  23. Vaca
  24. Torrez
  25. Guzman
  26. Suarez
  27. Aguilar
  28. Justiniano
  29. Romero
  30. Colque
  31. Cuellar
  32. Ramirez
  33. Vasquez
  34. Soliz
  35. Miranda
  36. Villca
  37. Morales
  38. Alvarez
  39. Ortiz
  40. Espinoza
  41. Ticona
  42. Villarroel
  43. Chambi
  44. Castro
  45. Calle
  46. Duran
  47. Mendez
  48. Jimenez
  49. Nina
  50. Gomez
  51. Rocha
  52. Salazar
  53. Cespedes
  54. Hurtado
  55. Torrico
  56. Herrera
  57. Camacho
  58. Rios
  59. Velasquez
  60. Rivero
  61. Mercado
  62. Roca
  63. Rivera
  64. Poma
  65. Limachi
  66. Salvatierra
  67. Ruiz
  68. Escobar
  69. Arias
  70. Zambrana
  71. Saavedra
  72. Tapia
  73. Orellana
  74. Pinto
  75. Paz
  76. Padilla
  77. Molina
  78. Quisbert
  79. Montaño
  80. Ortega
  81. Velasco
  82. Laura
  83. Ayala
  84. Cabrera
  85. Zurita
  86. Callisaya
  87. Zarate
  88. Cortez
  89. Medina
  90. Leon
  91. Terrazas
  92. Quiroga
  93. Calderon
  94. Yucra
  95. Claros
  96. Montero
  97. Aguilera
  98. Zeballos
  99. Mejia
  100. Paredes

 

Most common last names in Chile

  1. González
  2. Muñoz
  3. Rojas
  4. Díaz
  5. Pérez
  6. Soto
  7. Contreras
  8. Silva
  9. Martínez
  10. Sepúlveda
  11. Morales
  12. Rodríguez
  13. López
  14. Fuentes
  15. Hernández
  16. Torres
  17. Araya
  18. Flores
  19. Espinoza
  20. Valenzuela
  21. Castillo
  22. Ramírez
  23. Reyes
  24. Gutiérrez
  25. Castro
  26. Vargas
  27. Álvarez
  28. Vásquez
  29. Tapia
  30. Fernández
  31. Sánchez
  32. Carrasco
  33. Gómez
  34. Cortés
  35. Herrera
  36. Núñez
  37. Jara
  38. Vergara
  39. Rivera
  40. Figueroa
  41. Riquelme
  42. García
  43. Miranda
  44. Bravo
  45. Vera
  46. Molina
  47. Vega
  48. Campos
  49. Sandoval
  50. Orellana
  51. Zúñiga
  52. Olivares
  53. Alarcón
  54. Gallardo
  55. Ortiz
  56. Garrido
  57. Salazar
  58. Guzmán
  59. Henríquez
  60. Saavedra
  61. Navarro
  62. Aguilera
  63. Parra
  64. Romero
  65. Aravena
  66. Pizarro
  67. Godoy
  68. Peña
  69. Cáceres
  70. Leiva
  71. Escobar
  72. Yáñez
  73. Valdés
  74. Vidal
  75. Salinas
  76. Cárdenas
  77. Jiménez
  78. Ruiz
  79. Lagos
  80. Maldonado
  81. Bustos
  82. Medina
  83. Pino
  84. Palma
  85. Moreno
  86. Sanhueza
  87. Carvajal
  88. Navarrete
  89. Sáez
  90. Alvarado
  91. Donoso
  92. Poblete
  93. Bustamante
  94. Toro
  95. Ortega
  96. Venegas
  97. Guerrero
  98. Paredes
  99. Farías
  100. San Martín

Most common last names in Colombia

  1. Rodríguez
  2. Gómez
  3. González
  4. Martínez
  5. García
  6. López
  7. Hernández
  8. Sánchez
  9. Ramírez
  10. Pérez
  11. Díaz
  12. Muñoz
  13. Rojas
  14. Moreno
  15. Jiménez

 

Most common last names in Costa Rica

  1. Rodríguez
  2. Vargas
  3. Jiménez
  4. Mora
  5. Rojas
  6. González
  7. Sánchez
  8. Ramírez
  9. Hernández
  10. Castro

 

Most common last names in El Salvador

  1. Reyes
  2. Mora
  3. Jiménez
  4. González
  5. Hernández
  6. Morales
  7. Sánchez
  8. Ramírez
  9. Pérez
  10. Calderón

 

Most common last names in Ecuador

  1. Hernández
  2. Martínez
  3. López
  4. García
  5. Rodríguez
  6. Flores
  7. Pérez
  8. Ramírez
  9. González
  10. Rivera
  11. Vásquez
  12. Cruz
  13. Mejía
  14. Rivas
  15. Sánchez
  16. Reyes
  17. Díaz
  18. Ramos
  19. Gómez
  20. Escobar
  21. Orellana
  22. Romero
  23. Aguilar
  24. Alvarado

 

Most common last names in Spain

  1. García
  2. González
  3. Fernández
  4. Rodríguez
  5. López
  6. Martínez
  7. Sánchez
  8. Pérez
  9. Gómez
  10. Martín
  11. Jiménez
  12. Ruiz
  13. Hernández
  14. Díaz
  15. Moreno
  16. Álvarez
  17. Vaca
  18. Romero
  19. Alonso
  20. Gutiérrez
  21. Navarro
  22. Torres
  23. Domínguez
  24. Vázquez
  25. Ramos

 

Most common last names in Honduras

  1. Martínez
  2. López
  3. Rodríguez
  4. Flores
  5. Hernández
  6. Mejía
  7. García
  8. Rivera
  9. Reyes
  10. Pineda

 

Most common last names in Mexico

  1. Hernández
  2. García
  3. Martínez
  4. López
  5. González

 

Most common last names in Paraguay

  1. González
  2. Benítez
  3. Martínez
  4. López
  5. Giménez (also spelled Jiménez)
  6. Vera
  7. Duarte
  8. Villalba
  9. Ramírez
  10. Fernández
  11. Gómez
  12. Acosta
  13. Rojas
  14. Ortiz
  15. Cáceres
  16. Rodríguez
  17. Núñez
  18. Ayala
  19. Báez
  20. Galeano
  21. Ferreira
  22. Cabrera
  23. Romero
  24. Franco
  25. Sosa
  26. Espínola
  27. Brítez
  28. Cardozo
  29. Torres
  30. Caballero

 

Most common last names in Perú

  1. Flores (also spelled Flórez)
  2. Quispe (also spelled Khespy, Quechua*)
  3. Sánchez
  4. Rodríguez
  5. García
  6. Rojas
  7. González
  8. Díaz
  9. Chávez
  10. Torres
  11. Ramírez
  12. Mendoza
  13. Ramos
  14. López
  15. Castillo
  16. Espinoza
  17. Vázquez
  18. Huamán (Quechua)
  19. Pérez
  20. Vargas
  21. Gutiérrez
  22. Fernández
  23. Castro
  24. Mamani (Aymara**)
  25. Ruiz
  26. Romero
  27. Martínez
  28. Morales
  29. Reyes
  30. Salazar

 

* Quechua refers to any or indigenous people of South America who speak Quechua languages, which originated among the indigenous people of Peru. Although most Quechua speakers are native to its country of origin, there are some significant populations living in Ecuador, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia and Argentina.

** The Aymara or Aimara people are an indigenous people in the Andes and Altiplano regions of South America; about 1 million live in Bolivia, Peru and Chile.

 

Most common last names in Uruguay

  1. Rodríguez 
  2. González 
  3. Pérez 
  4. Martínez
  5. Fernández
  6. García 
  7. López
  8. Sosa 
  9. Silva 
  10. Pereira

 

Most common last names in Venezuela

  1. González
  2. Rodríguez
  3. Pérez
  4. Hernández
  5. García
  6. Martínez
  7. Sánchez
  8. López
  9. Díaz
  10. Rojas
  11. Ramírez
  12. Castillo
  13. Gómez
  14. Romero
  15. Torres
  16. Fernández
  17. Mendoza
  18. Medina
  19. Moreno
  20. Gutierrez

 

Conclusion

There are over 400 native speakers of Spanish in Spain and Latin America. Although there are many Spanish last names, the reading of this article will make it very clear that some last names, specially those ending with “ez” (González, Pérez, Fernández, Rodríguez, etc.) are very frequent among Spanish speakers. The list of popular Spanish last names varies from country to country, but some last names are common even across countries.    

 

Resources

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Spanish boys names | The ultimate list

Spanish boys names | The ultimate list

¡Hola, amigas y  amigos de SpanishCompadres.com! Looking for the perfect Spanish name for a boy is an interesting challenge, since there are many beautiful Spanish boys names. We want to help you by sharing a list with almost every single male name in the Spanish language.  

Spanish boys names are actually quite easy to obtain, since Spanish culture is preeminently catholic. Spanish speaking countries use the Roman catholic calendar, which contains the names of all catholic saints and blessed men and women. Each important person in catholic history has a day in the calendar. Popular Spanish boys names are Andrés, Alberto, Alejandro, Álvaro, Antonio, Benjamín, César, Cristian, David, Diego, Felipe, Francisco, Gabriel, Ignacio, Javier, Juan, Jesús, José, Luis, Manuel, Mario, Miguel, Óscar, Pablo, Pedro, Roberto, and many others. Let’s check them out.     

Table of contents

 

Names with A

Aarón

Ábaco

Abdías

Abdón

Abel

Abercio

Abilio

Ableberto

Abraham

Abrahan

Abrúnculo

Absalón

Abudemio

Abundio

Aca

Acacio

Acardo

Acario

Acépsimas

Acindino

Acisclo

Acucio

Acursio

Adalardo

Adalberto

Adán

Adelardo

Adelfo

Adeltrudis

Adeodato

Ado

Ádol

Adolfo

Adón

Adri

Adrián

Adriano

Adrión

Adventor

Afraates

Agabio

Agabo

Agapio

Agapito

Agatángelo

Agatón

Agatónico

Agerico

Agileo

Agnelo

Agno

Agoardo

Agricio

Agrícola

Agripano

Agripino

Agus

Agustín

Aiberto

Aidano

Aigulfo

Airaldo

Alano

Alberico

Albertino

Alberto

Albino

Albuino

Aldebrando

Aldelmo

Alderico

Alejandro

Alejo

Álex

Alexis

Alferio

Alfonso

Alfonso María

Alfreda

Alfredo

Alipio

Almaquio

Alonso

Alpiniano

Alto

Álvaro

Alverto

Amable

Amado

Amador

Amancio

Amando

Amaranto

Amasio

Ambico

Amón

Amonio

Amós

Ampelo

Anacario

Ananías

Anastasio

Andéolo

Andrés

Andresito

Andrónico

Anecto

Anfiloquio

Ángel

Angelito

Angilberto

Aniceto

Anisio

Annon

Ansano

Ansberto

Ansovino

Antelmo

Antenodoro

Antero

Antidio

Antigio

Antimo

Antíoco

Antipas

Anto

Antoliano

Antolín

Antonio

Apfías

Apolinar

Apro

Aproniano

Aquila

Aquileo

Arconte

Ardano

Ardón

Ares

Aretas

Argeo

Argimiro

Aristarco

Arístides

Aristón

Armogastes

Arnoldo

Arnulfo

Arquelao

Arquipo

Arsacio

Artemas

Artémides

Arturo

Ascla

Asclepíades

Asincrito

Asterio

Atenógenes

Ateo

Atilano

Atón

Attalo

Auberto

Audaz

Audomaro

Augus

Augusto

Aureliano

Aureo

Auspicio

Austindo

Austremonio

Austricliniano

Autónomo

Auxano

Auxencio

Avelino

Aventino

Avertano

Avito

Azarías

Azas

 

Names with B

Baco

Balbino

Baldji

Baldo

Baldomero

Balduino

Balsamo

Barbaciano

Barbado

Barlaán

Barnardo

Barsimeo

Bartolomé

Basi

Basiano

Basileo

Basilio

Basino

Básolo

Basso

Bastián

Baudillo

Baudolino

Bautista

Bavón

Báyulo

Beano

Beato

Belino

Benigno

Benilde

Benincasa

Benito

Benja

Benjamín

Benón

Bentivolio

Bercario

Berna

Bernal

Bernaldo

Bernardo

Bernardino

Berni

Berny

Bernyangie

Bert

Bertin

Bertoaria

Bertoldo

Bertolo

Bertrán

Bertuino

Besa

Besarión

Beto

Bianor

Bicor

Birino

Bladulfo

Blas

Bonito

Bononio

Bonoso

Borja

Bova

Brandán

Brendán

Bretanión

Brian

Brinolfo

Brocardo

Bronislao

Bruno

Buenaventura

Burcardo

 

Names with C

Calepodio

Calínico

Caliopio

Calixto

Calminio

Calógero

Cami

Camilo

Cándido

Canión

Caralipo

Carauno

Caritón

Carlitos

Carlo

Carlos

Carmelo

Carponio

Carterio

Casiano

Casimiro

Casio

Cástor

Castrense

Castriciano

Cástulo

Cataldo

Catulino

Cayetano

Cayo

Ceada

Ceferino

Celedonio

Celerino

Cenerico

Censurio

Cerbonio

Charbel

Chema

Chris

Chus

Ciriaco

Cirilo

Ciro

Clarencio

Claro

Claudia

Claudio

Clemente

Cleofás

Cleónico

Clicerio

Clodoaldo

Clodulfo

Colmano

Colomano

Columbano

Conón

Conrado

Constable

Constancio

Constantino

Contancio

Convoión

Corbiniano

Corentino

Cosme

Crescenciano

Crisóforo

Crisógono

Crisóstomo

Crisotelo

Crispín

Crispiniano

Crispino

Cristiano

Cristina

Cristóbal

Crodegango

Cruz

Cucufate

Curcodomo

Cutberto

 

Names with D

Dacio

Damián

Danacto

Dani

Danie

Daniel

David

Davino

Decoroso

Deicolo

Delfín

Demetrio

Dictino

Didio

Diego

Dimas

Dimbalac

Dionisia

Dionisio

Dioscórides

Dióscoro

Diosgracias

Disibodo

Dodón

Domiciano

Domingo

Domnolo

Droctoveo

Drogón

Dubricio

Dula

Dutaco

 

Names with E

Eadberto

Edda

Edelboldo

Edmundo

Edu

Eduardo

Egberto

Egidio

Egvino

Eladio

Eldrado

Eleucadio

Eleuterio

Elfego

Elías

Elifio

Elimenas

Eloy

Elpegio

Elredo

Emanuel

Emanuela

Emerico

Emeterio

Emigdio

Emiliano

Emilio

Emmanuel

Endón

Engelberto

Engelmond

Enrike

Enrique

Epafras

Epafrodito

Epifanio

Epímaco

Epipodio

Erasmo

Erasto

Erconvaldo

Erhardo

Erico

Ermenfredo

Ermengol

Erminio

Ernesto

Ernino

Esdras

Esiquio

Espiridión

Esteban

Estercacio

Esturmio

Estyliano

Etbino

Etelberto

Eubulio

Eucario

Eudón

Eufra

Eufrasio

Eugendo

Eugeniano

Eugenio

Eugrafo

Eulampio

Eulogio

Eumenio

Euno

Euprepes

Euquerio

Eusebio

Eusicio

Eustacio

Eustaquio

Eustasio

Eustracio

Eutimio

Eutiquiano

Eutiquio

Evagrio

Evaristo

Evasio

Evecio

Evelio

Everardo

Evergislo

Evermodo

Evorcio

Expedito

Exuperancio

Eze

Ezequiel

 

Names with F

Fabián

Fabricio

Facio

Facundo

Fandila

Fantino

Farnacio

Faustino

Fausto

Febadio

Fede

Federico

Felano

Feliciano

Felicísimo

Felipe

Félix

Fer

Fergusto

Fermín

Fernando

Ferreol

Ferreolo

Festo

Fian

Fibicio

Fidel

Fidenciano

Fidencio

Fidolo

Filastrio

Fileas

Filemón

Filogonio

Filomeno

Finiano

Fintán

Flananio

Flaviano

Florenciano

Florencio

Flósculo

Foca

Focio

Folcuino

Folenino

Fortunato

Fran

Francesc

Francisco

Francisco Javier

Franco

Francy

Fraterno

Frigidiano

Frodoberto

Froilán

Fructuoso

Frumencio

Frutos

Fugacio

Fulberto

Fulcrán

Fulgencio

Furseo

 

Names with G

Gabi

Gabino

Gabriel

Gaciano

Galdino

Galgano

Galicano

Gamalberto

Gangulfo

García

Gaspar

Gaudencio

Gauderico

Gaudioso

Gaugerico

Gausberto

Gelasio

Geldunio

Gelosio

Gemelo

Geminiano

Gémino

General

Geraldo

Gerardo

Gerásimo

Geremaro

Gereón

Gerlaco

Germán

Germánico

Gervasio

Gil

Gilberto

Gildas

Gisleno

Glicerio

Goar

Godofredo

Gonza

Gonzalo

Gonzo

Gordio

Gosberto

Gracia

Graciliano

Grato

Gregorio

Grimoaldo

Guala

Gualterio

Guarino

Guerrico

Guiberto

Guillermo

Guimera

Gulstano

Gumaro

Guntero

Gurias

Gutmaro

 

Names with H

Hartman

Héctor

Hegesipo

Helio

Heliodoro

Heracles

Hermágoras

Hermenegildo

Hermes

Hermetes

Hermías

Hermilo

Hermipo

Hermócrates

Hermógenes

Hermolao

Herodión

Herón

Hidulfo

Hierón

Higinio

Hilario

Hilarión

Hildeberto

Himerio

Hipólito

Hirenarco

Homobono

Honesto

Honorato

Honorio

Hortelano

Hospicio

Huberto

Hugolino

Humfrido

Humilde

Hungero

 

Names with I

Ignacio

Ilídio

Iluminado

Ingenuino

Íñigo

Inocencio

Irenarco

Isabelino

Isidro

Ismael

Isquirión

Israel

Iván

Ivón

 

Names with J

Jacinto

Jacob

Jacobino

Jacobo

Jaime

Jandro

Jasón

Javi

Javier

Jere

Jesús

Joaco

Joako

Joaquín

Job

Jocundo

Joel

Jonato

Jordán

Jorge

Josafat

Josberto

José

José Manuel

José María

Joseba

Josemaría

Jovencio

Joviniano

Jovino

Juan

Juanan

JuanCarlo

Juanfra

Juanicio

Juanjo

Juanlu

JuanMa

Juaquín

Judas

Judicael

Judoco

Julián

Julio

Justino

Juventino

 

Names with K

Kentigerno

Khodianin

Kierano

Kike

Kiko

Kouradjis 

 

Names with L

Lacuto

Ladislao

Lamano

Lamberto

Landelino

Launomaro

Laureano

Lauren

Laurentino

Lauton

Laverio

Lázaro

Leandro

Leo

Leobato

Leobino

León

Leonardo

Leoncio

Leónidas

Leónides

Leopardo

Leopoldo

Leotadio

Leucio

Liberal

Liberato

Liberio

Liborio

Licarión

Licerio

Lifardo

Lino

Litifredo

Loren

Lorenzo

Lucas

Luciano

Lúcido

Lucífero

Lucinio

Lucio

Ludano

Ludgero

Ludovico

Luifer

Luis

Luka

Lukas

Lulo

Lupencio

Lupercio

Luquesio

Luxorio

 

Names with M

Macario

Maclovio

Magda

Maglor

Maglorio

Magnerico

Mainbodo

Mainquino

Malaquías

Malardo

Mamas

Mamerto

Manahén

Mancio

Mane

Manolo

Mansueto

Manu

Manuel

Mapálico

Marce

Marcelo

Marciano

Marcolino

Marcos

Márculo

Mardario

Mariano

Marino

Marmaduco

Marón

Martín

Martiniano

mártires

Maruta

Marutas

Mateo

Matías

Matroniano

Maturino

Maurino

Mauro

Mauronto

Max

Maxi

Maximiano

Maximiliano

Maximino

Máximo

Maxy

Mayolo

Mayórico

Mederico

Meinrado

Melas

Melchor

Melecio

Melis

Melito

Melquíades

Menas

Menigno

Mercurial

Mercurio

Mesrob

Metrano

Metrobio

Michel

Miguel

Migueli

Miguelin

Miles

Minervo

Miniato

Mirocles

Mirocleto

Mishel

Mitrio

Modoaldo

Monaldo

Muciano

 

Names with N

Nacho

Nadal

Nafanión

Nahúm

Nano

Narciso

Narno

Natal

Natalán

Nazario

Nemesio

Nerses

Néstor

Nicasio

Nicecio

Nicetas

Nicko

Nico

Nicodemo

Nicolás

Nicomedes

Nicón

Niko

Niniano

Noé

Nonio

Nono

Nonoso

Norberto

Nostriano

Numeriano

 

Names with O

Obicio

Océano

Octaviano

Octavio

Oderisio

Odilón

Odón

Odorico

Oengo

Olegario

Olimpio

Onesiforo

Onésimo

Onofre

Optaciano

Orestes

Oriol

Oscar

Oseas

Oskar

Osmundo

Ostiano

Osvaldo

Ovidio

 

Names with P

P.Miguel

Pablito

Pablo

Pachi

Paciano

Paciente

Packo

Paco

Pacomio

Pafnucio

Pako

Paladio

Palatino

Palemón

Pantaleón

Panteno

Papías

Papiniano

Paquito

Paramón

Parmenio

Partenio

Pascasio

Pascual

Pasícrates

Patapio

Paterniano

Patricio

Patroclo

Pau

Paulino

Pausilipo

Pedro

Pelayo

Pepe

Pepelu

Perfecto

Perpetuo

Petronaco

Petronio

Piatón

Pientio

Pierio

Pimenio

Pinito

Pío

Pionio

Pirmino

Policronio

Polieuto

Poliodoro

Polión

Pompeyo

Pomponio

Ponciano

Poncio

Ponto

Popón

Porciano

Posidio

Potino

Potito

PPedro

Pragmacio

Primitivo

Principio

Prisciliano

Probo

Proceso

Proclo

Procopio

Próculo

Prosdócimo

Próspero

Protadio

Protasio

Protógenes

Provino

Prudencio

Publio

Pusicio

 

Names with Q

Queremón

Quinidio

Quique

Quírico

Quodvuldeo

 

Names with R

Radbodo

Radulfo

Rafa

Rafael

Raimundo

Rainaldo

Rainerio

Ramiro

Ramón

Raul

Raveriano

Redento de la Cruz

Reginaldo

Remberto

Renato

Ribogerto

Ricardo

Ricerio

Richi

Riel

Rigo

Rigoberto

Rigomerio

Riqui

Rober

Roberto

Rodolfo

Rogato

Román

Romano

Romarico

Romedio

Romeo

Romualdo

Rómulo

Roque

Rosendo

Rubén

Rubn

Rufilo

Rufo

Ruperto

Rutilio

 

Names with S

Sabas

Sabiniano

Sabino

Sadoc

Sadoth

Sagar

Salustiano

Salva

Salvador

Salvio

Sam

Samonas

Samu

Samuel

Sancho

Sandalio

Santi

Santiago

Santino

Santos

Sarbelio

Sármata

Saturio

Saturnino

Saviano

Seba

Sebaldo

Sebastián

Secuano

Secundino

Segismundo

Segundo

Seguro

Senano

Senén

Serapión

Sereno

Sergio

Serrano

Servacio

Servio

Sérvulo

Severiano

Severino

Severo

Siagrio

Sico

Sidney

Sidronio

Sifrido

Sigeberto

Sigfrido

Sigiramnio

Sigisberto

Silas

Silvano

Silverio

Silvino

Silvio

Símaco

Simeón

Similiano

Simò

Simón

Simplicio

Sireno

Siricio

Sisebuto

Sisenando

Sisinio

Siviardo

Sofonías

Sofronio

Sola

Solútor

Sosipatro

Sóstenes

Sotero

Suintino

Suitberto

Sulpicio

Superio

 

Names with T

Tadeo

Talaleo

Tarcisio

Telesforo

Teliavo

Temístocles

Teo

Teobaldo

Teodomiro

Teodoro

Teodulfo

Teódulo

Teófanes

Teófano

Teofilacto

Teófilo

Teógenes

Teógeno

Teona

Teonas

Teonesto

Teopempo

Teoprepides

Teotonio

Tercio

Terenciano

Thorlaco

Ticiano

Ticón

Tigrio

Tilón

Tipaso

Tiranión

Tirso

Tiziano

Tolomeo

Tomás

Ton

Torcuato

Toribio

Toros

Torpetes

Totnano

Tranquilino

Trifilio

Trifón

Trípodes

Triverio

Troadio

Troyano

Trudón

Tugdual

Turiavo

Tutón

 

Names with U

Ubaldo

Udalrico

Umberto

Urbicio

Uri

Ursicino

Ursino

Ursmaro

Urso

 

Names with V

Valencio

Valentín

Valentiniano

Valeriano

Valerio

Varo

Vedasto

Venancio

Venerando

Ventura

Venustiano

Verano

Verecundo

Veremundo

Vicelino

Vicente

Víctor

Victoriano

Victorico

Victorino

Victorio

Victricio

Vidal

Vidiciano

Vigor

Víktor

Vincenciano

Virgi

Virgilio

Vital

Vitón

Vivaldo

Vivencio

Vivenciolo

Viviano

Volusiano

Vulframno

Vulfrano

Vulmaro

 

Names with W

Walfrido

Wenceslao

Wilehado

Wilfer

Wilfredo

Wilibrordo

Winoco

Winwaleo

Wolfgango

 

Names with Y

Yago

Yván

 

Names with Z

Za

Zaca

Zacarías

Zach

Zenas

Zenón

Zoelo

Zoilo

Zósimo

Zótico

 

Conclusion 

We have presented a list with 1,280 Spanish boys names. If you are looking for a name for a newborn, we suggest doing a little bit of research in terms of popularity or whether if it’s a word that has some kind of connotation or double meaning or any other variable that may affect the person who will carry the name for the rest of his days. In the introduction of this article we presented some names that are pretty popular in all Spanish speaking countries. The popularity of names varies in different regions, so you may take this fact into account by considering the boy’s background country. 

 

Resources

Nombres de niño. Available at https://www.santopedia.com/nombres 

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